<!-- BEGIN ASAVA SOCIAL SLIDER --> <!-- script facebook--> <div id="fb-root"></div> <script>(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = 'https://connect.facebook.net/en_GB/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0'; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script> <div class="imm-social-slider custom-imm" style="display: none;"> <div class="social-list"> <div class="list-img img-link link-facebook" target="content-facebok"> <i class="fab fa-facebook" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> <!-- <div class="list-img img-link link-twitter" target="content-twitter"> <i class="fab fa-google-plus" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> --> <div class="list-img img-link link-googleplus" target="content-googleplus"> <i class="fab fa-google" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> <!-- <div class="list-img img-link link-youtube" target="content-youtube"> <i class="fab fa-instagram" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> --> <div class="list-img img-link link-instagram" target="content-instagram"> <i class="fab fa-instagram" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> <!-- <div class="list-img img-link link-mail" target="content-email"> <i class="fa fa-envelope" aria-hidden="true"></i> </div> --> </div><!-- social list end --> <div class="social-content"> <div class="social-content-wrap content-facebok"> <div class="fb-page" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/scubajunctiondiving/" data-tabs="timeline" data-width="350" data-small-header="false" data-adapt-container-width="true" data-hide-cover="false" data-show-facepile="true"><blockquote cite="https://www.facebook.com/scubajunctiondiving/" class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/scubajunctiondiving/">Scuba Junction Diving Co. Ltd</a></blockquote></div> </div> <div class="social-content-wrap content-googleplus"> <div id="gpr_widget_custom_imm"> <div class="gpr-widget-inner gpr-minimal-light-style"> <div class="gpr-business-header gpr-clearfix"> <div class="gpr-business-avatar lazyload" data-bg="http://www.scubajunctiondiving.com/templates/rt_supra/immFolder/img/google-review-image.jpg"></div> <div class="gpr-header-content-wrap gpr-clearfix"> <span class="gpr-business-name"><a href="https://maps.google.com/?cid=11150733733844403765" title="Scuba Junction" ><span>Scuba Junction</span></a></span> <div class="star-rating-wrap"><div class="star-rating-size" style="width:63.7px;"></div></div><div class="gpr-google-logo-wrap"><img class="lazyload" data-src="/templates/rt_supra/immFolder/img/google-logo-small.png" class="gpr-google-logo-header" title=" Reviewed from Google" alt="Reviewed from Google" /></div><p class="gpr-rating-value" ><span>4.9</span>out of 5 stars</p> </div> </div> <div class="gpr-reviews-wrap"> <div class="gpr-review gpr-review-1"> <div class="gpr-review-header gpr-clearfix"> <div class="gpr-review-avatar"> <img class="lazyload" data-src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-MTKtuKD4F68/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAAAA/AGDgw-j9vjzgFUmVPijBu0j0nC47wyrf7Q/s128-c0x00000000-cc-rp-mo/photo.jpg?sz=100" alt="Katie Hayes" title="Katie Hayes"/> </div> <div class="gpr-review-info gpr-clearfix"> <span class="grp-reviewer-name"> <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/contrib/109116575620343547953/reviews" title="View this profile." ><span>Katie Hayes</span></a> </span> <div class="star-rating-wrap"><div class="star-rating-size" style="width:65px;"></div></div><p class="gpr-rating-value" ><span>5</span>out of 5 stars</p><span class="gpr-rating-time"> posted 1 month ago</span> </div> </div> <div class="gpr-review-content"> My husband and I decided to learn to dive whilst on our honeymoon. Well, I can honestly say this was a fantastic idea and I am so glad that we chose to do so with Scuba Junction. Scuba Junction isn’t the cheapest on the island but as far as we’re concerned you cannot put a price on safety. (And they are worth every penny!) As complete novices we started from the very beginning in a classroom format where for the first day we watched a PADI film to teach us the core essentials when it comes to diving. The lessons were then put into practise in the pool by our instructor Chips. (After an equipment orientation). Chips is a fantastic teacher!!!! As I was relatively nervous he eased my nerves and before I knew it all of my worries had gone. (And I was really enjoying it). Chips is an oracle of diving knowledge. He kept our lessons fun whilst teaching us so much. The lessons were over 4 days and were made up of 6 people: Chips - instructor Myself My husband Our new friend and fellow student And 2 training instructors for their own learning and our further support. We noticed that other (cheaper) diving schools had a high volumes of people during dives. But we felt lucky we had so much support. After practising our newly taught skills in the pool we graduated to our first ocean dive. Naturally, I became a bit nervous again as in a pool you can hold on to the side or get out of the water. But again, Chips listened, appreciated my apprehensions, calmed me down and got me through it. Again, as soon as I was in the ocean I forgot about my worries and was having a great time looking at all of the amazing fish and corals. Before I knew it I was on my final dive and filled with excitement. Initially learning to dive was something my husband wanted to do. But now I can hand on heart say how pleased I am that I joined him in learning. We can now explore the ocean together (up to 18m) and say it is the first achievement we did as a married couple. Without the patience, knowledge and support of Chips I would have given up. But he gave me the reassurances I needed, stayed with me during the dives (so I felt comfortable at all times) and by the end of it I felt really confident. Thank you to all the team at Scuba Junction. We really enjoyed our time with you all. (Not a bad little spot to learn at either) </div> </div><!--/.gpr-review --> <div class="gpr-review gpr-review-2"> <div class="gpr-review-header gpr-clearfix"> <div class="gpr-review-avatar"> <img class="lazyload" data-src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-7KRN5CMFq2Y/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAAAA/AGDgw-gOQM5bEsxktZL38jBXMtF7zKCMKg/s128-c0x00000000-cc-rp-mo/photo.jpg?sz=100" alt="Chris Bashall" title="Chris Bashall"/> </div> <div class="gpr-review-info gpr-clearfix"> <span class="grp-reviewer-name"> <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/contrib/116254037122345063162/reviews" title="View this profile." ><span>Chris Bashall</span></a> </span> <div class="star-rating-wrap"><div class="star-rating-size" style="width:65px;"></div></div><p class="gpr-rating-value" ><span>5</span>out of 5 stars</p><span class="gpr-rating-time"> posted 4 months ago</span> </div> </div> <div class="gpr-review-content"> Absolutely amazing dive shop. Heaps of fun on the dives and they treat you like a friend. We had a bad experience at another dive shop so we appreciated how honest they were with us rather than just try and take our money. All the instructors and dive masters are fun people who are happy to spend time with you after the dive to go through dive books or have a beer with you. They are a little bit more expensive than other shops but to spend $10 more and actually enjoy a dive that is safe and fun is definitely worth it and will be coming back here next Thailand trip </div> </div><!--/.gpr-review --> <div class="gpr-review gpr-review-3"> <div class="gpr-review-header gpr-clearfix"> <div class="gpr-review-avatar"> <img class="lazyload" data-src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-BfH0itlp6TY/AAAAAAAAAAI/AAAAAAAAvOk/c0wn5IhycZA/s128-c0x00000000-cc-rp-mo-ba3/photo.jpg?sz=100" alt="Amy Kim" title="Amy Kim"/> </div> <div class="gpr-review-info gpr-clearfix"> <span class="grp-reviewer-name"> <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/contrib/105508074603802507645/reviews" title="View this profile." ><span>Amy Kim</span></a> </span> <div class="star-rating-wrap"><div class="star-rating-size" style="width:65px;"></div></div><p class="gpr-rating-value" ><span>5</span>out of 5 stars</p><span class="gpr-rating-time"> posted 1 month ago</span> </div> </div> <div class="gpr-review-content"> My friend and I had the best experience getting open water certified with Scuba Junction. All of the staff (instructors, admin support, boat crew, dive masters) were extremely friendly and helpful. We received our instruction with Natalie and did two additional dives with Rob afterwards, and both were absolutely fantastic. I felt safe and relaxed throughout the whole time. They had small classes and really great quality gear. It was such a memorable experience and I would not hesitate to recommend Scuba Junction to anyone who wants to learn or go diving in Koh Tao. 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Did You Know?....

 

72% of the earth is covered in water
- only 3.5% of this is fresh water
- and 1.7% of that is ice

Water is the most important resource in the world ( and soon will be the most expansive one )

- to create a pint of beer it takes 1.720 gallons of water
- 780 million people lack access to an improoved water source
- a jellyfish and a cucumber are each 95% water

Water is the most common substance found on earth

- up to 50% of water is lost through leakes in cities in the developing world
- 85% of the world population lives in the driest half of the planet
- water regulates the earth temperature
- 10% of homes have leakes that waste 90 gallons or more per day
- it takes 7 years for the averagee American residence to use the same amount of water that flowes over the Niagara Falls in one second ( 750.000 gallons )

Water is what we all need to survive think twice....

More from the amazing Mantis Shrimp..

Eagles may be famous for their vision, but the most incredible eyes of any animal belong to the mantis shrimp. Neither mantises nor shrimps, these small, pugilistic invertebrates are already renowned for their amazingly complex vision. Now, a group of scientists have found that they use a visual system that’s never been seen before in another animal, and it allows them to exchange secret messages.

As impressive as their arms are, the eyes of a mantis shrimp are even more incredible. They are mounted on mobile stalks and can move independently of each other. Mantis shrimps can see objects with three different parts of the same eye, giving them ‘trinocular vision’ so unlike humans who perceive depth best with two eyes, these animals can do it perfectly well with either one of theirs.

Their colour vision far exceeds our too. The middle section of each eye, the midband, consists of six parallel strips. The first four are loaded with eight different types of light-sensitive cells (photoreceptors), containing pigments that respond to different wavelengths of light. With these, the mantis shrimp’s visible spectrum extends into the infrared and the ultraviolet. They can even use filters to tune each individual photoreceptor according to local light conditions.
The fifth and six rows of the midband contain photoreceptors that are specialised for detecting polarised light. Normally, light behaves like a wave that vibrates in every possible direction as it moves along. In comparison, polarised light vibrates in just one direction – think of attaching a piece of string to a wall and shaking it up and down. While we are normally oblivious to it, it’s present in the glare that reflects off water and glass and we use polarising filters in sunglasses and cameras to screen it out.
Light can also travel in a the shape of a helix, moving as a spiralling beam that spins either clockwise (right-handed) or anti-clockwise (left-handed). This phenomenon is called ‘circular polarisation’. Tsyr-Huei Chiou from the University of Maryland found that the mantis shrimp’s eye contains the only known cells in the animal kingdom that can detect it. Our technology can do the same, but the mantis shrimps beat us to it by as much as 400 million years.

 

Facts about Moray Eels.



They are considered to be the largest of all eels and the most common cosmopolitan eel can be found in most saltwater marine environments, freshwater systems - even in some brackish waters. The moray eel classification is not endangered up to date despite being fished commercially in many countries.

Moray Eel Habitat

Morays tend to thrive better in shallow warm water habitats and especially near the seabed of coral reef formations or hidden in rock crevices and small caves.

Muraenidae are carnivores and the biggest eel of the species, the giant moray eels, will feed on almost all mollusks, squid, crabs, cuttlefish, octopuses, and small tropical fishes such as the damselfish families.

Moray eels typically kill their prey either by wrapping their body around the victim until it is crushed flat enough to swallow or often they will simply tear its prey into small bite-size pieces using two sets of razor sharp teeth. The back row of extra teeth help to break up the food ready for digestion.

One of the most curious of all moray eel facts is that it has two circular breathing gills located behind its head. They jabber their huge jaws constantly to circulate water from their mouth towards their gills.

Top moray eel facts
- the biggest moray eel species can grow to 5 meters long and weigh up to 14 kilos
- There are more than 200 moray eel species (Muraenidae) with an average lifespan of 20 years
- A moray eel looks similar to a snake but in fact morays are fishes
- Moray's teeth point backwards to preventing its prey escaping
- Some moray eel species produce a slippery mucus which contains toxins
- Morays are voracious predators themselves, but they are also hunted and eaten by barracudas and larger sharks
- Female morays release around 10,000 eggs after mating which initially hatch as tiny larvae drifting in plankton streams
- Despite commonly having large eyes, morays do not see well but they do have a good sense of smell helping them to find prey

The Uncompressive Titan Trigger Fish!


Koh Tao, our marine life is very diverse and is where I would like to take base in the Evil Titan Trigger Fish. Known scientifically as Bastiloides Viridescens. Is a beautiful and robust reef creature just waiting to be discovered. Usually swim around alone. These solitary creatures have been known to attack divers and might be cause serious injuries. But most of the time divers return with holes in them fins. People said that are getting attracted to colorful fins, what helps to don't get personal injuries.

Why the aggressive behavior?. Are merely reacting to what they perceive as threats to their nesting grounds, definitely a lesson for divers to respect the habitat of these fish, others seem to do so for fun of it. This much is clear, Titan Triggerfish are extremely territorial by nature. The male stands guard over its nest and will charge at any divers or fish that cross into its territory (the zone is a conic full circle directly above its nest). The nest is usually in a flat sandy area amongst the corals, an area that it will defend with a passion.

Bites should be taken seriously as they are ciguatoxic. That means is a natural poison which is found on some tropical reefs. It infects fish which feed on a marine algae. While harmless to the fish, even small amounts can have a harmful effect on humans. In cases of extreme poisoning, it may cause heart attacks, paralysis or death. The teeth, designed for crunching through hard shells and coral, can inflict serious wounds on any would-be intruders.

Titan Triggerfish are often solitary, and diurnal, meaning they are day-time fish, sleeping at night.

Won't always resort to violence though, on occasion just swimming at the intruder, usually a diver or snorkeler, to provide them with an escort out of the nesting territory. However, should a colorful male Titan happen to charge in your direction. It's best to do away with bravado and retreat, using your fins as a barrier between you and the fish!

Fish are fish right? Wrong...

Fish spotting is fun, no denying - but what makes fish REALLY interesting is knowing their quirky characteristic's.. Check out these fun fish facts to make spotting more fun...


- A male emperor angelfish lives together with up to five female mates. If the emperor angelfish dies, one of the females turns into a male fish and becomes the leader of the group

- The batfish plays dead when danger is near. It floats motionless on its side when scared, making it look like a dead leaf floating on the surface of the water.

- Seahorses are the only fish that swim upright!

- Fish use a variety of low-pitched sounds to convey messages to each other. They moan, grunt, croak, boom, hiss, whistle, creak, shriek, and wail. They rattle their bones and gnash their teeth. However, fish do not have vocal chords. They use other parts of their bodies to make noises, such as vibrating muscles against their swim bladder.

- Since a fish’s jaw is not attached to its skull, many fishes can shoot their mouths forward like a spring to catch startled prey.

- Sharks are the only fish that have eyelids.

- Most fish have taste buds all over their body

- A fish does not add new scales as it grows, but the scales it has increase in size. In this way, growth rings are formed and the rings reveal the age of a fish.

- Fish that have thin fins with a split tail indicate that they move very quickly or may need them to cover great distances. On the other had, fish that live among rocks and reefs near the ocean floor have broad lateral fin and large tails

- The fastest fish is the sailfish. It can swim as fast as a car travels on the highway

- Hammerhead sharks can live in schools of more than 500 sharks. The strongest female swims in the middle. When she is ready to mate, she shakes her head from side to side to signal the other female sharks to move away so she is the center of attention.

Happy Spotting!